Difference between revisions of "Spidergrams"

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[[Image:Spider map.jpg|thumb|113px| The outline of a spider map]]
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[[Image:Spider map.jpg|thumb|113px| The outline of a spidergram]]
  
 
Spidergrams, spidergraphs, spider diagrams and spider maps are all terms used to describe a mindmap-like hierarchical diagram.  There is no authoritative definition of these terms, just common use from which a general description can be derived.
 
Spidergrams, spidergraphs, spider diagrams and spider maps are all terms used to describe a mindmap-like hierarchical diagram.  There is no authoritative definition of these terms, just common use from which a general description can be derived.

Revision as of 09:07, 6 November 2008

The outline of a spidergram

Spidergrams, spidergraphs, spider diagrams and spider maps are all terms used to describe a mindmap-like hierarchical diagram. There is no authoritative definition of these terms, just common use from which a general description can be derived.

Spidergrams DO:

  • Have a central topic,
  • organize information in a pure hierarchy,
  • have text on horizontal node lines,
  • typically employ long phrases, or sentences.


Spidergrams RARELY:

  • use color,
  • use curved lines (other than round the central topic),
  • make much use of images added to the diagram,
  • have just one or two words entries (unlike a Buzan mind map),
  • use bubbles or boxes around nodes (see bubble diagram.


Other uses of these terms[edit]

“Spider diagram” has another (disputed) meaning in mathematics – see the Wikipedia entry. The term “spidergram” has an alternative meaning in geology and another in representing data where they are like radar plots / radar chart webs.