HONG KONG - After the 1970s - Hong Kong Museum of Art

IMGP9178.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/20.0; 1/250; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2518]
IMGP9176.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/14.0; 1/200; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2519]
Waterfall at Aberdeen, Hong Kong; William Havell (1782 -1857) (attri.) ca. 1816
Watercolour on paperThis small painting is one of the earliest visual records of Hong Kong, believed to be the work of one of the envoys at the Amherst Embassy, completed on the ship to China in 1816.
The small boat in the painting is transporting the sailors to the waterfall to collect water. The waterfall still stands today in Waterfall Bay Park beside the Wah Fu Estate in Aberdeen, with its water flow decreasing since the construction of Pok Fu Lam Reservoir.; IMGP9181.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2520]
Relates to previous image; waterfall, pok fu lam.jpg; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2848]
The European 'Factories' in Guangzhou (Canton); During the 80 years from 1757 to the end of the Opium War (1842), the Qing court adopted the "Canton System" where foreign trade was only allowed from Guangzhou. As a result, Guangzhou became the earliest region to be exposed to Western culture. The city prospered and grew in material abundance, its fame spread far and wide. It earned the reputation of being "London in the East". The Pearl River was even known as the "River Thames in the East".
It looks like a European city in a glance, but it is in fact the foreign factories outside the Guangzhou city, which are dedicated houses for foreign traders to stay in China. William Daniell was a Fellow of the Royal School of Art in the UK. He visited China in 1785 and from 1793 to 1794 and was one of the few 18th century Western painters to have visited China personally.; IMGP9183.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/40; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2522]
Many Chinese pointers set up their studios in Guangzhou to produce expert art with Western painting techniques, which was widely popular with the foreign traders. This is an important work depicting three painters working in front of the window, with various paintings hung on the wall. Most painters hired apprentices who mass-produced China trade paintings through division of labour.; IMGP9187.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/8; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2524]
The work consists of three pieces and depicts one of the most devastating fires that happened to the foreign factories in Guangzhou. The paintings capture the incident from the first glimpse of the rising flames, to the rubble and debris in the aftermath. The fire took place at nine in the evening on the 1st of Nov. 1822. It was caused by a fire at a bakery near the foreign factories, to which the fire had already spread by the following morning. From the painting in the middle, we can see that the wind was blowing in the north-east direction and causing the fire to spread rapidly to the entire neighbourhood. On the sea we can see the rescue fleet of foreign traders coming from Whampoa and nearby areas to lend their assistance. The fire burned for two days and two nights, in which most of the factories and thousands of shops and livelihoods of residents were completely destroyed. More than 50,000 people were made homeless with a staggering loss of property.; IMGP9189.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2526]
IMGP9190.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2527]
IMGP9192.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/13; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2528]
Sampan girl; The sampan girls portrayed in the works of famous painter George Chinnery are said to be classics among the portraits of Southern Chinese women. His most characteristic painting style is on full display in this work: With touches of the brush that are brisk but not careless, and the light source cleverly poised in projection on her face and upper body, the artist elicits the daintiness of the character using his most beloved scarlet shade on her facial contours, scarlet lips, below her arms and between her fingers — a working class maiden in China portrayed almost as an elegant and charming upper-class socialite of the West. The sampan girls are the few female folk known by the Westerners in the Southern China region. For a meagre pay, the women would lead foreign trading ships entering the inner harbour or pick up merchants on short journeys along the coast.; IMGP9194.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2530]
The painting depicts a view from Causeway Bay to Sai Wan, showing Hong Kong then as an already established commercial port in 1850s. Sir Paul Chater was one of the most influential businessmen in the early years of Hong Kong. In 1926, Sir Paul Chater left his art collection to the Hong Kong government, including oil paintings, watercolours, sketches, and prints, which are important historical visual records of the treaty ports along the coast of the South China Sea in the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as of activities in China.; IMGP9196.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.0; 1/125; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2532]
The two oil paintings present the magnificent view of the Guangzhou port in the mid-19th century. The paintings are rare large-sized China trade art pieces that have remained well-preserved to this day. Both paintings adopt the full frontal view typically used in China trade paintings. A panoramic view of the waterfront at Honam shows the views of Honam (Island) across the shore from the foreign factories. Honam as a subject is rarely seen in China trade paintings before the 1840s. It was only after April 1847, when foreign merchants were allowed to lease warehouses formally in Honam and began to move there, that Honam become more important in the eyes of the Westerners. Very few landscape paintings of Honam fram the 19th century remain ta this day. This painting is one of such handful that has survived.; IMGP9199a.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2534]
China trade paintings were long regarded as not more than crude licensed goods. In recent years, research that has revealed that the historical records and the details in the China trade paintings are astonishingly consistent. This was a new breakthrough for cross-sectional study in the field, and has changed the way the world evaluates China trade art. In the centre of the painting are the foreign factories. Visible to the right of the foreign factory with an American flag is some shrubbery, which is where the British and other factories were originally located before they were destroyed in a major fire in 1842. On the left is the French factory with the French flag flying on the top which places the time of painting in the period where French envoy Théodore de Logrené was deployed to the factory, that is from the end of 1844 to Jan 1846. The British and other factories had already completed the majority of the construction of a cluster of buildings by Jul 1845. The sketchy contours of the roof in the painting show that the buildings were in the process of reconstruction. We can therefore conclude that the painting was made between end 1844 and Jul 1845.; IMGP9200.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2536]
Teapot; Inspired by the organic form of a snail, this curved teapot was the product of a collaboration between contemporary Yixing potter Wang Yinxian and pottery designer Zhang Shouzhi. It is a combination of form and function, through the fusion of traditional Yixing clay teapot craftsmanship and modern design aesthetic. The initial design draft of Zhang Shouzhi infused
modern aesthetic element into the Yixing clay teapot, which Wang Yinxian then turned from graphic design into a physical piece. The curved line gives it a simple form with rich dynamic, penetrating the entire body of the teapot. Along with the geometric changes line and surface, an interesting negative space is formed between the spout and handle, creating a contrast between movement and stillness, emptiness and solidity, and channelling the beauty of rhythm.
; IMGP9207.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2538]
Lin Fengmian is known as the Father of Chinese Modern Art, Having spent some time in his early years in France as a student, he immediately became a pioneer of the art reform movement in China upon his return to his homeland, This landscape painting from later years shows us how brush strokes were used to paint the background
in black, creating a backlit effect through mottled brilliant colours that bring out the autumn leaves, as though
reflecting his pursuit of, and unwavering belief in, art throughout his difficult life.; IMGP9210.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/20; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2540]
One of the famed, The Boat People series ; by Fang Zhaoling. With the turbulence of Vietnam in the 1970s and 80s many refugees fled the country, with Hong Kong offering sanctuary and refugee policy that would last a further 25 years. This work depicts fleeing refugees. The sea is diffused with indigo in a subdued tone, while the extensive inscriptions recount the painters, personal hardship and emotional turmoil during her experience of displacement during the Second World War. Expressing her sympathy and concern for Vietnamese refugees who have journeyed to Hong Kong the work is Fangs homage to the film Boat People, and a lament on the cruelty of war, and a longing for world peace.; IMGP9212.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2542]
A book from the sky; This is the fruit of Xu Bing's creative labour over a four-year period from July 1987 to the autumn of 1991. He invented over 4,000 pseudo-characters, which would be typeset and printed in the ascetic and rigorous process of creating this incomprehensible work of art. The work looks like a classic text to be found in the great halls, but actually consists of "writing" that is utterly devoid of meaning. The work is the painter's critique of traditional values, and a challenge to the establishment through abstract and metaphorical expression.
In 2000, A book from the sky was exhibited in Hong Kong as part of a touring exhibition. It attracted the criticisms
of conservatives calling it a work of "ghosts building walls" — obfuscation for the sake of obfuscation — insinuating
the artist has a questionable state of mind. Amidst the controversy, the Museum decided to acquire the work. It
was realized with the sponsorship of Bei Shan Tang Foundation.
Today, A book from the sky is not only the seminal work of Xu Bing that made his reputation, but also a classic
work referenced most frequently by scholars in discourses on the contemporary phenomena of Chinese art.; IMGP9223.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/9.0; 1/50; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2544]
A book from the sky; IMGP9225.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2546]
A book from the sky; IMGP9224a.jpg; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2547]
Hong Kong has long been a testing ground for over a century, where a small fishing village was turned into a business hub that nurtured economic miracles and a society that bridged the East and West. There were neither lessons from history nor examples in the present for reference. It was the people living in the city who made their own experience. Likewise, Hong Kong's art development has as well undergone such unique "Hong Kong experience". The whole new lifestyle triggered innovative ideas and prompted the artists to break a new ground for Hong Kong art with their spirit of "Hong Kong experiment". For more than half a century the Hong Kong Museum of Art has been collecting Hong Kong art, much like a time capsule caching the memories of our bygone times. With our manifold collections, we endeavour to create exhibitions with new themes continually in attempt to gather the threads of the stories of Hong Kong art from different angles.; IMGP9226.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2548]
Zao Wou-ki (1921 - 2013)
10.9.73
1973
Oil on canvas
In 1958. Zao, an emerging artist in the French art world, was invited by New Asia College to a semester teaching in Hong Kong, during which he provoked a revolutionary change in Hong Kong art scene that inspired many young artists such as Lui Shou-kwan, Douglas Bland and Wucius Wong to explore avant-garde art.; IMGP9228.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2550]
Circle of 1968; Van Lau (1933- )
Bronze
Van began creating sculptures in the 1960s. He developed a new style that fuses oriental elements with geometric structures such as squares and circles. Van Lau and Cheung Yee were both important members of the Circle Group which kept pace with the latest trends of American Abstract Expressionism and organised exhibitions locally and overseas.; IMGP9230.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2552]
Skull in a faded dream; Chao Shao-an (Zhao Shao'ang)
(1905 -1998)
1955
Ink and colour on; IMGP9233.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2554]
Victoria Harbour; Lui Shou-kwan (1919 - 1975)
1965
Ink and colour on paper; IMGP9235.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2557]
Flooded metropolis; Gilbert Pan (1933 — )
1962
Oil on canvas; IMGP9237.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/60; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2559]
Feeling after snow; Koo Mei (1934- )
Not dated
Ink and colour on paper; IMGP9239.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2561]
Rhapsody; Cheng Kar-chun (1918 — 2000)
1961
Ink on paper; IMGP9241.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/100; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2563]
Befriend via arts - pine and bamboo; Kan Tai-keung 1942
Set of three, ink on paper
Kan started his journey in design and ink painting in the 1970s. Composed of the three initials of Alliance Graphique Internationale (AGI), this work depicts the spirit of pine, plum and bamboo with soft brushstrokes, demonstrating his long-term pursuit in
integrating Oriental charm with design aesthetics.; IMGP9243.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2565]
Befriend via arts - pine and plum; Kan Tai-keung 1942 -
2018
; IMGP9244.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2566]
Scintillating Hong Kong harbour; Wucius Wong (1936 - )
1999
Ink and colour on paper; IMGP9250.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2569]
Internet; Leung Kui-ting (1945 --
2009
Mixed media; IMGP9251.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/7.1; 1/160; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2571]
Befriend via arts - pine and moon; IMGP9245.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2567]
Inverse; Tien Chi (1949- )
2001
Ink on paper; IMGP9253.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/60; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2573]
Untitled; Tsang Hung-yu, Lawrence (1954— )
Not dated
Mould-made stoneware and earthenware; IMGP9255.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/100; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2575]
Small flower; Choi Yan-chi (1949- )
Not dated
Oil and acrylic on canvas; IMGP9257.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2577]
Midnight search; Chan Yuk-keung (1959 — )
1989
Mixed media; IMGP9259.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/8; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2579]
IMGP9262.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/13; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2581]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9263.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2582]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9269.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2583]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9264.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/30; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2584]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9265.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2585]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9266.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2586]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9267.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2587]
Baggage; Lik-yan (1964 -
2005
Set of five, painted teak; IMGP9268.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/30; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2588]
Waiting; Wong Shun-kit (1953 -
1996
Oil on board
Wong moved to Hong Kong in the 1980s and engaged actively in the art scene. He organised the Artist Commune and ran for election to the Hong Kong Arts Development Council. In response to the 1997 reunion, he made use of self-portrait and a mixture of symbolic objects to represent his complex cultural identity and reflection.; IMGP9271.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2590]
Untitled (after dream of a path); Leung Chi-wo, Warren (1968— )
1996
Set Of five rubbings, oil on paper
In 1996, Patrick Lee, Leung Chi-wo, Warren, Sara Wong, Tsang Tak-ping, Phoebe Man. Leung Mee-ping and Lisa Cheung founded Para Site, the first autonomous space for artists in Hong Kong, realising their dream for independence since the 1980s. This work. created by Leung Chi-wo, Warren after the completion of his first exhibition at Para Site titled "Relic/lmage", is a set of rubbings of the texts carved on the at the exhibition venue. The work leaves a record for the exhibition, continues to inform Leung's thinking on the history and culture of Hong Kong and provides inspiration for successive generations of artists to further explore spatial possibilities,; IMGP9274.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2592]
IMGP9277.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/13; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2594]
IMGP9278.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/15; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2595]
IMGP9279.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/20; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2596]
IMGP9276.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2597]
Unfolded; Chan Wang, Max (1991- )
2012
Set of three, photography
The twin tower blocks of public housing estates have been a common memory shared by Chan and many Hong Kong people. He recorded the homes of Hong Kong people with his camera, and by using post- production technology he "unfolded" the originally three-dimensional blocks to reveal the world in which people live.; IMGP9280.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2598]
Frog King, "The taxi didn't stop when the driver saw me in costume."; Chow Chun-fai (1980- )
Set of four, acrylic on canvas
From being a part-time taxi driver to now a full-time artist, Chow has witnessed the changes of the art ecosystem. Although Hong Kong's art market is booming, the depiction of the embarrassment encountered by the famous Hong Kong performing artist, Kwok Mang-ho (Frog King), who was refused a taxi ride when he dressed up in costume, has demonstrated the fact that there is still a distance between art and life.; IMGP9282.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2600]
So near yet so far (Mongkok version); Leung Mee-ping (1961 - )
2001
Mixed media
Leung moved back to Mong Kok, where she grew up, in 2000. She collected mailboxes in the district and recorded the voices and conversations of the people living or working there including domestic helpers, new immigrants and guards, at places such as amusement game centre, karaoke bar, local cafe and more, to reflect the cultural diversity of the area.
You are welcome to come closer to the mailboxes and listen to the sounds and chats in the district.; IMGP9284.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2602]
IMGP9285.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/20; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2603]
Pat Sin Leng (from the Spring Breeze Pavilion to the Lion Pavilion); Wong Chun-hei, Stephen (1986- )
2018
Diptych, oil on canvas
Wong stepped out from the cramped city into the countryside. With his brushes and portable easel, he captured the spring breeze blowing through the lush green mountains under the bnght sky of Hong Kong; IMGP9287.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2605]
IMGP9289.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/15; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2607]
IMGP9290.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2608]
IMGP9292.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2609]
IMGP9293.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/40; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2610]
English factories at Canton (after Piqua); B. Clayton (drawn)
ca. 1840
Lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9295.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/60; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2611]
Temple of Supreme Felicity; F. G. B. Bedwell (delineated)
residence of the allied mission
at Tientsin
1858
Sepia lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9301.jpg; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/80; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2613]
Canton factories; Anonymous
ca. 1835
Coloured engraving
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9297.jpg; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2624]
Canton; Anonymous-(drawn)
Thomas Kelly (published)
ca. 1670
Engraving
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9299a.jpg; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/50; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2626]
Signing the Treaty of Tientsin; Anonymous
1858
Coloured (chromo-) lithograph
Donated bv Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9303.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/50; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2628]
Ranks of soldiers outside the British factory, Guangzhou; Lieut. Martin (drawn);
Day and Son (lithographed);
Henry Graves (published)
1847
Coloured lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Returned from Mr Sinn Chi Lam in 1946; IMGP9305.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/50; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2630]
The taking of the Anunghoi batteries; Lieut. Martin (drawn);
Ihomas Picken (1815 1870) (lithographed);
Henry Graves (published)
1847
Coloured lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9307.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/60; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2632]
Attack on the Peiho forts on 20 May 1858, Teintsin; William Simpson (1823 — 1899) (drawn);
Thomas Picken (1815 — 1870) (lithographed)
1858
Coloured lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9309.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2634]
The Whampoa reach; William John Huggins (1781 — 1845) (drawn);
Edward Duncan (1804 — 1882) (etched)
ca. 1820
Coloured aquatint
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9311.jpg; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2636]
Attack of the H.M.S. Imogene and Andromache at Bocca Tigris; William Skinrer (drawn);
G. S. Madeley (lithographed)
1834
Coloured (chromo-) lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9313.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2638]
H.M.S. B1enheim; Anonymous
ca. 1825
Oil on canvas
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Collected by the United Kingdom Reparations and Restitution
Delegation in Japan in 1950; IMGP9315.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/60; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2640]
Canton barbers and fishermen and shepherd.; Barrier dc L. (drawn); Auguste Bry (1805-1880) (lithographed)
The space between the factories and the river, Guangzhou
Coloured lithograph
Donated bv Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9317.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/30; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2642]
Map of the city of Canton and its suburbs; W. Bramston (drawn);
James Wyld (1812 — 1887) (engraved and published)
1840
Engraving
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9319.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/60; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2644]
IMGP9321.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/40; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2646]
The Praya Grande from the north, Macau; Anonymous
ca. 1850
Gouache on paper
Donated by Sir Paul Chater; IMGP9322.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2649]
Dent & Co's house; Anonymous (photographed);
The China Magazine (Hong Kong) (published)
ca. 1858
Photograph
Donated bv Sir Paul Chater
Returned from Mr F. A. Xmier between 1945 and 1946; IMGP9324.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/30; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2651]
D'Aguilar Street, Victoria, Hong Kong; Edward Ashworth (1814 — 1896) (drawn)
1845
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Returned from Mr F. A. Xavier between 1945 and 1946
; IMGP9326.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2653]
Guangzhou factories; Barrier de L. (drawn) Auguste Bry (1805 — 1880) (lithographed)
1841
Coloured (chromo-) lithograph
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Returned from Mr F. A. Xavier between 1945 and 1946
; IMGP9328.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2655]
Foreign factories in Guangzhou; Anonymous
ca. 1820
Oil on canvas
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Returned from Mr F. A. Xavier between 1945 and 1946
; IMGP9330.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/20; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2657]
Distant view of Guangzhou; John Nieuhoff(1618 — 1672) (delineated)
ca. 1669
Engraving
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Returned from Mr F. A. XaGer between 1945 and 1946
; IMGP9332.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/40; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2659]
IMGP9334.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/15; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2661]
Auriquès (engraved) Peking; ca. 1700
Coloured engraving
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
Discovered in 1949 and returned from the University of Hong Kong; IMGP9336.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2662]
Engagement of the Alceste with the Bocca Tigris forts in 1816; John McLeod (? - 1820) (drawn); Dubourg (engraved);
Edward Orme (1775 — 1848) (published)
1816
Aquatint
Donated by Sir Paul Chater
; IMGP9338.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/15; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2664]
IMGP9340.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2666]
Flower-shaped lamp in qingbai glaze; Song dynasty (960 — 1279); IMGP9341.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/60; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2667]
Ewer and basin in qingbai glaze; Northern Song (llth — early 12th century); IMGP9342.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/60; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2669]
Cong shaped vase in celadon glaze; Longquan ware
Southern Song (1127-1279); IMGP9347.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/60; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2671]
Bowl in hare's fur glaze; Jian ware,
Northern Song (960 — 1127)
; IMGP9349.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/20; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2673]
Vase with paper-resist design of prunus spray design; in black glaze, Jizhou ware
Song dynasty (960 — 1279); IMGP9353.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/40; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2675]
Ribbed jar with two looped-handles in black glaze; Cizhou ware
Northern Song (960 — 1127); IMGP9356.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/125; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2677]
Jar painted with iron-rust floral sprays; on black glaze, Cizhou ware
Jin dynasty (1115 — 1234); IMGP9358.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/15; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2679]
Pear-shaped vase; painted with iron-rust floral sprays
on black glaze, Cizhou ware
Jin dynasty (1115 — 1234); IMGP9360.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2681]
Mortar with floral scroll design; in black(?) on white ground, Cizhou ware
Northern Song 960 — 1127)
; IMGP9363.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/100; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2683]
Flask with dragon and phoenix design; in black on white ground, Cizhou ware
Song dynasty (960 — 1279)
; IMGP9367.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/40; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2685]
Pair of bowls in cafe-au-lait glaze; Six-character mark of Kangxi and of the
(1662 — 1722), Qing dynasty; IMGP9370.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/10; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2687]
Vase in tea-dust glaze; Six-character mark of Qianlong and of the period
(1736 — 1795), Qing dynasty
Ceramics; IMGP9375.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/10; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2689]
Pair of plates in turquoise glaze; Six-character mark of Qianlong and of the
(1736 — 1795), Qing dynasty; IMGP9379.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/20; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2691]
Porcelain of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) represents an accumulation of ceramic technology spanning many generations, with firing and crafting techniques reaching the peak of excellence during the years of Emperor Kangxi (1662-1722), Yongzheng (1723-1735) and Qian1ong (1736-1795). In the Qing dynasty, the imperial kiln improved its underglaze blue, wucai, doucai and monochrome glaze products, and developed its innovative fencai ware and opaque enamels during the Kangxi reign. The vessels had novel, diverse shapes, and many were created in the vogue of archaism, exhibiting premium ceramic craftsmanship.; IMGP9381.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2693]
Plate with incised dragon design; in blue glaze
Wanli period (1573 — 1620), Ming dynasty
Ceramics; IMGP9382.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/20; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2694]
Brush-washer ; in peach-bloom glaze
Six-character mark of Kangxi and of the period
(1662 — 1722), Qing dynasty
Ceramics; IMGP9386.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/80; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2696]
Cong-shaped vase; in Ge-type glaze
Six-character mark of Qianbng and of the period
(1736 — 1795), Qing dynasty
Ceramics; IMGP9390.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/13; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2698]
Gilt bronze figure of Amitabha; Kangxi period (1662 — 1722),
Qing dynasty
Metal; IMGP9392.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/100; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2700]
Short-necked vase in blue Jun glaze; Ming dynasty (1368 — 1644)
Ceramics; IMGP9396.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/60; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2702]
Liu Hai with three-legged toad; Liu Chuan (1916 - 2000)
Seal of 'Wanxi Liu Chuan'
Early 20th century
Ceramics; IMGP9398.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/13; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2704]
Stone; Gao Fenghan (1683 - ca. 1749)
1732
Stone (Qingtian); IMGP9400.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/10; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2706]
Crab and ear of grain carved in the round; Kangxi period (1662 — 1722), Qing dynasty
Bamboo; IMGP9401.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/13; 3200; ©ROY_GRUBB [2708]
Brush-rest; in the shape of nine chi-dragons carved in the round
18th century
Bamboo; IMGP9405.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/25; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2710]
Black and gilt lacquer folding fan; with scenes of figures in garden in reserved panels
ca. 1840; IMGP9408.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/6.3; 1/200; 12800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2712]
Black and gilt octagonal lacquer tea caddy; with figures and chinese poems in reserved panels
ca. 1780; IMGP9411.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/13; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2714]
Black and gilt octagonal lacquer tea caddy; with figures in garden scene
ca. 1820; IMGP9414.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2716]
IMGP9416.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/125; 12800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2718]
IMGP9418.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/20; 12800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2719]
IMGP9424.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.6; 1/100; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2720]
The beaten-metal ceiling plays with light.; IMGP9421.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2721]
IMGP9425.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/8.0; 1/50; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2722]
IMGP0143.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/25; 1600; ©ROY_GRUBB [2793]
IMGP0141.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/25; 2500; ©ROY_GRUBB [2794]
IMGP0142.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/25; 4000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2795]
IMGP0196.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/20; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2796]
IMGP0194.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2797]
IMGP0195.JPG; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2798]
IMGP0204.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/30; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2799]
IMGP0197.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/15; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2800]
IMGP0198.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/15; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2801]
IMGP0199.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/30; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2802]
IMGP0200.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/13; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2803]
IMGP0201.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/15; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2804]
IMGP0202.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/30; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2805]
IMGP0203.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/30; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2806]
IMGP0205.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/5; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2808]
IMGP0206.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/13; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2809]
IMGP0207.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/10.0; 1/50; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2810]
IMGP0208.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/10.0; 1/50; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2811]
IMGP0209.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/9.0; 1/50; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2812]
IMGP0210.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/8.0; 1/400; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2813]
IMGP0220.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/50; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2815]
IMGP0211.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/6; 800; ©ROY_GRUBB [2814]
IMGP0212.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/3.5; 1/50; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2807]
IMGP0213.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/30; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2816]
IMGP0214.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/50; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2817]
IMGP0215.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/80; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2818]
IMGP0216.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/80; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2819]
IMGP0217.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/60; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2820]
IMGP0218.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/125; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2821]
Exquisite fillagree; IMGP0219.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/160; 6400; ©ROY_GRUBB [2822]
Black3.jpg; ; ©ROY_GRUBB [2911]
Flowers; Paolo Porpora
(Naples, ca. 1617 — Rome, ca. 1673)
ca. 1665-1670
Oil on canvas
The compositional elegance of the arrangement of different flowers, the varied colour palette, and the thick brushwork that highlights the volume of the blooms are hallmarks of Porpora's style. These features recall works by contemporary Roman floral painters with whom the artist was in contact around the middle of the 17th century. Looking to the influence of Dutch and Flemish masters popular in Rome and Naples, Porpora specialised in depictions of forest flora and fauna.; IMGP0221.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/100; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2825]
Still Life with Morning Glories and Boule de Neige Roses; Andrea Belvedere
(Naples, ca. 1652-1732)
1680-1690
Oil on canvas
Belvedere's refined and crepuscular composition is as remarkable for its beauty as it is for its botanical specificity. The two flowers, rendered with striking fidelity to nature, are known for their hallucinogenic and pain-relieving properties. The cascading blooms and harmonious colours unite the work's aesthetic and scientific features in quiet celebration of the natural world. Belvedere, one of the last Neapolitan still life specialists, was particularly renowned for his opulent but sentimental portrayals of flowers. Along with Giordano, Belvedere travelled to the court in Madrid, where he served both royalty and the aristocracy between 1694 and 1700.; IMGP0223.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/30; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2827]
Still Life with Head of a Goat; Giovan Battista Recco
(Naples, 1660)
ca. 1650
Oil on canvas
The genre of still life, which reached its apex in the 17th century, is the naturalistic portrayal of diverse objects designed to highlight the artist's descriptive skills, often with a moral message underlying the composition. In this work, objects are arranged in a linear fashion to maximise visibility. Myriad surfaces — glass, candle wax, copper, porcelain and pockmarked cheese are choreographed to highlight their distinct textures. The realism of Recco's painting is pleasing to the senses of both touch and sight. Recco was an artist who was unknown until the 1960s. His nephew, Giuseppe Recco, also produced high-quality still-life. Although not the first Neapolitan still-life painter, he was one of the first to introduce Caravaggesque light into the genre and to take up the kitchen scene popular with Spanish artists.; IMGP0225.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/100; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2829]
Still Life with Festoons of Flowers and Game; Giuseppe Recco
(Naples, 1634 —Alicante, 1695)
1671
Oil on canvas
In this painting, Recco combines the genres of still life (foreground) and landscape (background). In the former, a dog in the shadows stands guard above hunting rifles and games. The animals are stacked in front of antique busts, reliefs, and sarcophagi covered with sumptuous garlands of flowers. In the background, hunters stroll through the landscape under crepuscular light. The combination of artistic genres underscores the imaginative possibilities of the still-life genre in Naples during the late 17th century. The pleasure of the genre was that it permitted a profusion of subtle meanings and allusions. For instance, the trumpet hangng from the rfle refers to the trumpets that announce the Last Judgment in Revelation 8: 6 — 9; IMGP0227.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/50; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2831]
Supper at Emmaus; Matthias Stomer
(Amersfoort, ca. — Sicily, after 1650)
ca. 1632-1635
Oil on canvas
After His Resurrection, Jesus [is said to have] dined at an inn with two of His disciples in the village of Emmaus. His two followers [improbably] failed to recognise Him until He blessed the evening's bread. The candlelit miracle is ripe with naturalistic detail, like the table-setting resembling a still-life and the wrinkled face of the grey-bearded disciple. Caravaggio painted the Supper at Emmaus twice. Stomer's close-knit, dinner table setting is derived from these masterpieces. Dutch followers of Caravaggio pioneered the motif of an intimate interior illuminated by a single candle, Dutchman Stomer enjoyed a successful career in Naples (ca. 1633-1640) and Sicily (ca. 1640-1650) pointing religious works that weave together these Northern and Southern European styles.
[A fine painting, very difficult to do justice to this in a photograph because it was in a dimly-lit part of the gallery.]; IMGP0230.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/13; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2833]
The Last Judgment (copy after Michelangelo); Marcello Venusti
(Mazzo di Valtellina, 1512/1515 — Rome, 1579)
1549 Tempera grassa on panel
This is the most important copy of the fresco of the Last Judgment Michelangelo painted in the Sistine Chapel. Pope Paul III commissioned the fresco and his grandson Cardinal Alessandro Farnese commissioned this copy to preserve Michelangelo's monumental creation in the family collection. Only this copy features the original appearance of the fresco before Daniele da Volterra covered the body parts that were considered indecent by the authorities of the Counter-Reformation in 1565.
Here, Venusti has made minor but significant changes to Michelangelo's original. Venusti used the technique of tempera a secco to paint drapery over the nude figures, rendering the fresco more modest. He adjusted the positions of Saint Catherine and Saint Blaise to make them better conform to ideas of decorum that were promoted by the Counter-Reformation. Finally, he added a portrait of Michelangelo in the lower left corner of the panel.; IMGP0236.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/125; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2839]
Danaë; Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
(Pieve di Cadore, 1488/1490 — Venice, 1576)
1544-1545
Oil on canvas
Danaë has always loved by powerful men. In Greek, Danaë was the daughter Of King Acrisius of Argos. An oracle predicted that the king would die by the hand of an as-yet-unborn grandson. TO prevent his untimely death, Acrisius locked his daughter in a bronze tower. In this Titian represents the climax of Danaë's story: reclining on a luxurious bed, she has an affair with Zeus, who has transformed himself into the golden cloud her. From this encounter, the hero Perseus — who would later slay Medusa — was born.
The painting was commissioned by Alessandro Farnese in 1545 and has always been considered one of the most important masterpieces in the Farnese Collection. Between late 1943 and early 1944, the work, which had been stored for safekeeping during WWII, was sent to Germany. Hermann Goëring, one of Hitler's closest collaborators, had compiled a list of Renaissance nudes he desired for his personal display, and this work entered his private collection. After the war, the painting was found and returned to its rightful place in Italy.; IMGP0232.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/80; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2835]
Antea; Parmigianino
(Francesco Maria Mazzola)
(Parma, 1503 — Casalmaggiore, 1540)
ca. 1535
Oil on canvas
From the way she is dressed, this woman must be a member of the aristocracy, but her identity is still unknown. Perhaps she is Parmigianino's "beloved Roman lady" or on allegorical figure of beauty.
Parmigianino was particularly talented at rendering surfaces and textures, and this work provides artist the opportunity to explore, down to the smallest detail — the soft skin of the marten on her shoulder, the reflections in the polished surfaces of her gems, and the crinkle of her silken gown. The precious painting is not documented and scholars still debate whether it belongs to the artist's Roman years (1524 — 1527) or the 1530s. when he returned to Parma and demonstrated a more pronounced reflection on the figures. symbolically elongated, as with the famous Madonna with the Long Neck, now in the Uffizi, Florence.; IMGP0234.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/60; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2837]
Boy Blowing on an Ember; El Greco
(Doménikos Theotoköpoulos)
(Candia, ca. 1541 - Toledo, 1614)
1571-1572
Oil on canvas
The ancient Greek scholar Pliny described an ancient painting recreating the effects of a flame illuminating a face in his work Natural History. By representing a similar subject centuries later, EI Greco showed his knowledge of a Classical Greek text and his great skill in visual description.
Doménikos Theotokòpoulous, a painter from Venetian-controlled Crete, is known mainly for his illustrious career in Spain (where he was nicknamed "El Greco" or "the Greek"), However, before his Spanish period, he travelled to Venice, where he was exposed to the work of Titian and Tintoretto, and to Rome, where he entered the service of the Farnese through the introduction of Fulvio Orsini. Orsini was an advisor to and librarian for the Farnese, and he likely advised El Greco on his recreation of the lost Greek painting to demonstrate the family's knowledge of antiquity.; IMGP0238.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.5; 1/40; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2841]
Eruption of Vesuvius from the Maddalena Bridge; Pierre Jacques Volaire
(Toulon, 1729-Nap1es, 1799)
1782
Oil on canvas
Between 1770 and 1790 Vesuvius was almost constantly active with frequent, spectacular eruptions. The French painter Volaire specialised in nocturnal views of Vesuvius erupting, creating a unique genre distinct from the scientific and documentary style of landscape painting popular among other foreign artists active in the city. Volaire's contrast of the warm, bright tones of the lava with the deep night sky evokes notions of the sublime.; IMGP0240.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/60; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2843]
Ferdinand IV of Bourbon with His Court at Capodimonte; Antonio Joli
(Modena, 1m -Naples, 1777)
Early 176(k
Oil on canvas
Joli depicts a youthful King Ferdinand on horseback with his soldiers and dignitaries as he leaves the Palace of Capodimonte. One of the Bourbon royal residences, Capodimonte played an important role in the city's cultural life. It was home to the royal family and court, as well as the art collection that would become the foundation of today's museum.; IMGP0246.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/5.0; 1/125; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2840]
View of Naples from Capodimonte; Alexandre Hyacinthe Dunouy
(Paris, 1757 —Jouy-en-Josas, 1841)
1813
Oil on canvas
A puff of smoke rises from the volcano Vesuvius, reminding the city of Naples of its potential for destruction. Close to the ancient buried cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, Naples was often the last stop on the European Grand Tour, a journey to Italy affluent young men took to study the art and culture of the ancient world and the Renaissance.; IMGP0242.JPG; PENTAX K-1 Mark II; f/4.0; 1/100; 16000; ©ROY_GRUBB [2845]